Sending Mixed Signals to the Staff


7caRMj4gi.png

You got to love the senior manager that just yesterday preached to the team the virtues of treating people with respect, even pointing to the ever present value statements on the wall, and ripping your face off today for something that happened. What the heck?

 

Nothing to see here, this is Corporate America on most days of the week.

Get used to it. “Do as I say and Not as I do.”

 

While I published two books on how to have a productive learning function, I’d be a lot richer if I had come up with another culture book with some new idea for how to motivate and get everyone on the same page. CEOs would be lining up to buy all of their managers a copy of my book, and no doubt I would be engaging in some pointless, yet very expensive workshop to train their leaders. Everyone would be hyped for a couple of months and then only Sherlock Holms would be able to locate the enthusiasm that once existed.

It is very trendy to spout from on high the latest ideas, and jump head first into an implementation with no outcomes. It makes everyone, (including the board of directors) think you are engaging people. At the same time you are leading the new direction, you fail to monitor behaviors. When people are told one thing and they experience another, the energy dissolves away quickly.

Like lawmakers that pass new legislation to fix one problem while ignoring the five other problems the legislation creates, managers often implement processes that do the same thing.

I know a company right now that struggles with hiring even basic roles, so current staffs remaining are stretched thin keeping up on the work being short staffed. Yet management adds work to the teams that one could argue would challenge full staffs to complete, to already overworked people, because it supports their new initiative. No one thinks about the effects on existing staff, just their newest initiative. Team members start to quit, and HR fails to alert anyone because it means throwing a curve that will slow down the new program.

How does this happen? People are scared to send up yellow flags let alone red flags. Management has made it clear “we are here to support you” while in reality they don’t want to hear about anything that is negative. I know of a CEO that was called in to fix an ailing company that was full of mixed signals. His solution was simple and direct. In the course of 90-days he evaluated all senior managers and fired a whopping 90% of them and replaced them with people he knew walked their talk. It has been almost a year since then and the company is back and doing good.

So if you tell someone to act a certain way, it isn’t hard to succeed. Model the behaviors and hold people accountable.

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s