Everyone Loves a Sale; Except Those That Can’t Make Decisions


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Whenever you see a sale that is short, like a 24 hour sale, or maybe a 48-hour sale, it is usually a good sale because it comes with a very short timeframe to make a decision. Since most people struggle with decision making, they will often spend quite a bit more to avoid being forced to act quickly.

In the past year and a half selling travel (cruises, tours and resort vacations) I have been frustrated by the few and far between really good offers that come up and with it a short time to market. Yet these short timeframe deals have saved my clients a lot of money when I can get them to act quickly. I find that most of the time though, my clients will procrastinate beyond the sale date and lose out.

It is the same in corporate purchasing. When the shoe was on the other foot and I was negotiating with vendors for a lower rate, or added perks to my deal, often it came with a limited time to purchase. Depending how many more hoops I had to clear internally before being able to say yes, I could lose out on savings because I took too long to commit.

Organizations that empower people to make decisions without fear of termination often have a robust and energetic workforce where things are always moving quickly, including decision making. This environment often saves money because they can act quickly.

I felt so bad recently when a client passed up an offer on a cruise because he took too long to make up his mind, and when he finally got around to being ready to book the ship was full. Not only was he going to be paying full fares by waiting, he landed up missing out completely because he waited. Now we are looking for a comparable cruise and everything available is costing more.

Then there is the school of thought that some people simply are not motivated by a sale price or added perks. They purchase off the rack at full retail pricing without bothering to ask about pricing. If these people exist, I have not yet met them.

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